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Edible seaweeds

Nori Seaweed (Laver): The Intriguing Health Benefits of the World’s Most Popular Seaweed

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Laver, or nori, is a kind of red algae and is probably the most widely-eaten seaweed in the world, primarily as the wrapping for sushi. Laver is also commonly served as flat crispy seaweed sheets that you can get at most grocery stores. Aside from having a delicious nutty flavor once dried, laver is packed with nutrients. Check out the long list of vitamins and minerals found in laver:

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•   Calcium

•   Choline

•   Copper

•   Folate

•   Iron

•   Magnesium

•   Manganese

•   Niacin

•   Omega-3 Fatty Acids

•   Omega-6 Fatty Acids

•   Pantothenic Acid

•   Phosphorus

•   Potassium

•   Riboflavin

•   Selenium

•   Sodium

•   Thiamin

•   Vitamin A

•   Vitamin B12

•   Vitamin B6

•   Vitamin C

•   Vitamin E

•   Vitamin K

•   Zinc

As you can see, laver is dense with daily essentials and unique health benefits. For one, it is rich in iodine, which supports thyroid health. Like so much seaweed, laver is renowned for its anti-cancer and anti-viral properties.

Laver has also been shown to improve gut health and is recommended for people suffering from certain types of digestive ailments. The list of laver’s health benefits goes on and on, so it’s not crazy to call it a superfood.

Now that you know laver’s health benefits, you might be interested in foraging for it yourself. That’s right, you can collect your own laver right on the coast of California! It likes to grow on rocks by the water, and when you find some, there should be plenty of it to harvest. Take a look at the picture below so you know w
hat to look for:

 

Proceed with caution when harvesting, as the rocks will be slippery. Make sure you

have somewhere safe to store the laver, such as a cooler. Once you get it back

home, there are several ways to prepare it. You can make something simple, like

seaweed chips, or you can get a bit more adventurous with some unique recipes.

 

Welsh Laverbread Recipe:

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•                       600g fresh laver seaweed

•                       3 tablespoons olive oil

•                       1 to 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

•                       salt and pepper, to taste

•                       4 slices bread

•                       butter, to taste

Prep the seaweed by rinsing it off and then letting it simmer for 6 hours until it turns pulpy. Once this is done, simply mix in the seasoning, olive oil, and lemon juice, and give it a good stir. All that’s left to do is to toast the bread, add some butter, and spoon the laverbread on top. Serve immediately after making.

In Wales, this dish is known as bara lawr. It’s so popular there that you can actually buy canned laverbread. However, there’s nothing quite like cooking something that you foraged for yourself. Not only does this ensure you have the freshest ingredients, but there is a great deal of satisfaction that comes with eating something that you harvested in the wild. What better way to spend a day by the beautiful California coast than harvesting delicious and nutritious seaweed?

Ready to get out there and collect your own? Our Seaweed Adventures on the Sonoma coast are great for the beginner or veteran forager. Click below for dates and see you on the beach!



Edible seaweeds

Kombu Seaweed: The Umami Superfood!

 

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Sure, when it’s in the sea it might not look very appetizing, but several types of seaweed are delicious when prepared properly. Not only that, but seaweed is packed with nutrients. Take the edible kelp known as kombu, for example. Kombu can be found right off the coast, and there are literally kelp forests packed full of it. Kombu is known for its ability to improve digestion. Packed with amino acids and glutamic acid, eating kombu helps your body break down foods easier and minimizes both intestinal gas and discomfort.

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Sea vegetables like kombu may also help prevent cancer, thanks to their anti-inflammatory benefits. Kombu contains iron, which is a vital mineral for healthy cells, hair, nails, skin, and more. It’s common for people to have an iron-deficient diet, which leads to fatigue and other anemic symptoms. Adding kombu into your diet is a great way to ensure that you’re getting enough.


Kombu is actually the highest in iodine out of all edible seaweeds. In fact, it’s one of the most iodine-rich foods out there. Why is this important? Well, iodine improves thyroid function and is an essential mineral for healthy hormone production. Our bodies do not naturally produce iodine, meaning it’s essential to eat iodine-rich foods like kombu in order to maintain a healthy thyroid.

Lastly, kombu contains a sulfated polysaccharide known as fucoidan, which has been proven to stave off cell inflammation. Therefore, researchers suggest that eating kombu may be a possible treatment for the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. And we haven’t even mentioned all of the vitamins, calcium, and proteins that are found in seaweed! Now that you know all about why you should eat kombu, let’s go over a delicious recipe for you to enjoy.

 

Kombu Dashi (Stock):

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•   Wipe down the surface of kombu, but DO NOT rinse with water (which washes away the umami flavor)

•   Place the kombu into a pot of water (use around 5g of kombu per 500 ml of water)

•   Put on medium heat

•   Take kombu out right before the water begins to boil and enjoy the dashi!

Kombu is famous for its umami flavor, and it is used in Japan to make dashi, which is a soup that can also be used as cooking stock. Dashi is actually the base for many Japanese dishes, including miso soup. While several kinds of seaweeds can be used to make dashi, kombu is one of the tastiest and healthiest choices.

Once you’ve made your kombu dashi, you can store it in your fridge and heat it up when you’re in the mood for some delicious hot soup. Or, you can use it as stock to cook with. It’s an excellent stock alternative for vegetarians. Plus, its unique umami flavor is fun to experiment with and can really open up your cooking options.

 Of course, there are plenty of other ways to enjoy the taste and health benefits of kombu than dashi. Kombu can be dried, made into powder, and pickled. It’s even eaten as sashimi in Japan. So, pick up some kombu today and start enjoying its health benefits and unique flavor!

Ready to get out there and collect your own? Our Seaweed Adventures on the Sonoma coast are great for the beginner or veteran forager. Click below for dates and see you on the beach!

Edible seaweeds

The Unique Uses of Turkish Bath Towel Seaweed

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The health benefits of eating seaweed are widely known, but that’s not the only reason to get your hands on some. Have you ever heard of Turkish bath towel? This red seaweed is unique in both appearance and the ways to use it!

As you can see, Turkish towel has a bumpy texture. Actually, the seaweed’s reproductive organs cause these swellings to form on its surface. When placed in fresh water, they create a clear jelly, which is often used as a gelling agent for several different types of food.

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Turkish bath towel’s Latin name is chondracanthus exasperatus, but that’s a bit of a mouthful. It is widely known as the Turkish bath towel because when you touch the rough papillae surface, it feels very similar to a towel from a Turkish bath.

Interestingly, the blade thickness of Turkish bath towel is determined by its level of exposure. In more sheltered habitats, the blades are thinner, but in more natural and exposed areas, the blades are thicker and rougher to the touch. The gel within the blades is used as an ingredient in all types of things, including cosmetics.

Turkish bath towel can be found right off the coast of California, and its distinct look makes it pretty easy to find! Keep your eyes out for it next time you’re by the water. This seaweed likes to attach to rocks in the low intertidal area. It’s best grown in more exposed areas, as mentioned above. However, it is possible to be air-grown, so long as it is sprayed frequently with sea water.

Aside from being an ingredient for cosmetics and different gelling agents, Turkish bath towel has a few other unique uses. For one, as the name suggests, it can be used in baths as a natural exfoliating bath towel. It’s good for the skin, and the texture is perfect to scrub off any unwanted residue.

Turkish bath towel is commonly used for thalassotherapy, a form of therapy using seawater and sea products to refresh the skin’s pores by absorbing the potassium, calcium, sodium, iodine, and magnesium found in sea water.

Practitioners of thalassotherapy will tell you that Turkish bath towel is most effective for washing when it’s used within the sea that it comes from. That’s not to say that using it in a fresh water bath has no benefits, but harvesting some Turkish bath towel off the coast of California and giving yourself a relaxing wash in the ocean sounds pretty great, doesn’t it?

Add that to the many reasons you should harvest your own seaweed! Although Turkish bath towel is not edible, it has so many unique uses. With many seaweeds available in the California area, foraging for seaweed gives you another reason to spend a day by the water!

Ready to get out there and collect your own? Our Seaweed Adventures on the Sonoma coast are great for the beginner or veteran forager. Click below for dates and see you on the beach!