locavore

wild kitchen

Foraging Mussels

I love collecting mussels. These pics are from a couple weeks ago when me and my girlfriend went down south. Was a lot of fun, mix of work and play.  We actually got approached by a fish and game officer, so I was happy that I bought us both fishing licenses. Its worth it if you are going to collect mussels, because the fines are pretty intense. The limit for mussels is 10 lbs a person, and you’re only allowed to use your hands to pry them off (so no knives allowed!) Go at low or minus tide. Have fun! Things to bring:

Gloves

Bucket

Fishing license

I just heard an interesting story, that mussel fisherman down south used to save the threads from the mussel "beards" and make gloves out of them. Pretty cool, and makes sense, they are some strong threads.

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Pics from July Wild Kitchen Dinners

Here are our favorite pics from our last couple Wild Kitchen dinners by our amazing photographer Robin Jolin (robinjolin.com), who always makes the food look even more delicious than in real life. This dinner was eight courses, and featured a lot of great summer fruit, as well as some forageables from the coast and inland.  Thanks to all the people who came, it was a great crowd, and especially to the people who bartered such great stuff. Remember, we're always looking for people to barter skills, kitchen equipment, massages and the like. If you haven't checked them out yet, and want to get emailed when they're happening, sign up in the subscribe box on the homepage at foragesf.com. Thanks

Iso

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The Market Is Happening!!

It's all very exciting.  The underground farmers market has found a home, and is happening this thursday. Check out the deets below. Don't mind the formatting, can't be helped.

The Underground Farmers Market Has A Home! We've got some vendors, booked some music, and even got some homebrew lined up! It's happening this Thursday, December 17th, at 2755 Bryant Street There is going to be a lot of great stuff: jams, pies, edible garden boxes, wild mushrooms, acorn flour, homemade sarsaparilla, Jewish deli fare and homemade empanadas.

About

The underground farmers market is a venue where you can taste and purchase the food that is being made in the kitchens of our fair city. Call us voyeuristic, but this is a chance to peek into others' kitchens and share in their bounty. Pies, jams, sarsaparilla to feast on - all by "suggested donation."

To sell at a farmers market, you need to produce your wares in a commercial kitchen. This is an impossible expense for many of us, so the underground farmers market is about helping to get some exposure for all of our fellow producers without the cash for a commercial kitchen.

These are veterans, people who've been making their products for years, but only able to share them with friends. We thought we'd give them a venue to share with the whole SF food community.

So come join us this Thursday to support our local producers, get some last minute Christmas gifts and have some drinks to boot.


"What's that?" you ask. "I've heard of underground dinners, but an underground farmers market?"

That's right. A market, and a live show, all rolled into one. Think a farmers market, but at night, with music and drinks, and fresh roasted chestnuts.

Vendors forageSF: Acorn flour, fresh wild mushrooms, wild fennel seeds, huckleberry jam, wild Blackberry jam, and CSF gift certificates HeartBaker: Makes some amazing baked goods Slow Jams: Great homemade jam Will Schrom: Homemade sarsparilla (maybe the best soda you've ever tasted) Captain Blankenship: Soaps and salves Kelsey: Gingerbread houses Garden Fare: Edible garden gift boxes The Golden Crust: Pies, pies, pies The Girl From Empanada:  Homemade empanadas Lauren & Jon Bowne: Homemade Jewish deli fare (think corned beef, not gefilte fish) Five Flavors Herbs: Wild foraged tinctures

What: Underground Farmers Market

When: Thursday December 17th, 5-11pm

Where: 2755 Bryant St, SF

Cost: Free!!


5-8pm Drinks, Roasted Chestnuts, Shopping

8:30-9:30 Floating Felt 10-11 More drinks and shopping

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What it means to think about food

I recently heard an interview of an author who's written a book called "where locavores get it wrong...".  His basic thesis is that for someone who is concerned with the carbon footprint of their food, local is often not the right choice. It often is of course, but sometimes it makes more sense to import snap peas from Uganda than it does to walk down to the farmers market.  I guess this is true. I imagine the man did his research, as he was being interviewed on a show I trust, so I'm going to  take it as a given that he's not lying. So that begs the question...why eat local?  If we can get snap peas year round from disparate corners of the globe, always snappy and fresh (or at least fresh-ish), and at the same time reduce our carbon footprint, why all this talk of eating local? The answer that I've come to (full disclosure, Michael Pollan was also on the show, and he had a similar idea to the one I'm about to espouse, but I swear I thought it before he said it on the show) is that local food is about more than food. Wild food is about more than food.  People love wild foods, they're clearly delicious, often more nutritious (and I believe if the author had done his research on foraged foods he would have found they are much more carbon efficient, but put that aside for a second), but I'm not sure that's the main reason people love them. To me wild food is almost more about the connection to the place I live. I've lived in San Francisco for two years now (just had my anniversary), and I feel more a part of this place that almost anywhere else on earth.  I've explored more of the Bay than I have in VT, and I grew up there. I meet people every day that are interested in what I'm doing, and want to be involved. I know that a week after the first rains I'm going to mushroom forage, I know who I'm going with, I know what I will (or should) find. I'm honestly looking forward to going up to Mendecino next week to collect acorns, and making plans for the best way to get to the wild onions before the landscapers get them next spring. I feel a part of this place, and that has all sprung from my interest in the foods of this place.  I throw dinners that have become some of the most memorable meals of my life. I know chefs all over the city, and always know if I have a question about the food business I can ask Ian at Far West Fungi.  The people I call friends are the people who are actively working towards changing the way America eats. Creative people who, through their creativity, inspire people to see the world in a different way.

Local food is about much more it's carbon footprint. That's important of course, but what the local food movement is really about goes beyond the eating. It goes to a connection with the place you live, and the people that make that place important. When you buy a mushroom from a forager (or a farmer), you support that person, their community, expand your own community, and get to know the place you call home just a little bit better.