forage san francisco

SF Underground Market

and it was good.

Our very special Easter/Passover Underground Market is over (to be honest it had nothing to do with either of those holidays, but glad people could take a break from feasting to come by). It was quite a success.  We had over 40 vendors, 3200 eaters (a new record), a food truck (a first), and a line down the block.  We were much more careful about capacity this time, stopping entrance at 580 (after which we only let people in when others left), and it made for a much more manageable vibe. We also set up seating outside, so people had a place to sit down and eat. I've felt bad ever since we started having the market at Public Works about the over 21 policy (this is necessary because of the kind of license Public Works has), so we set up an area outside where kids could hang out and eat without actually going into the space. We had about 10 people take advantage of it, which isn't a lot, but a start.  We lowered the number of vendors inside this time around, so people would have more space to walk, and that also improved the overall feel I thought. Overall I (in my humble opinion), thought it was a really great market.

I had a great time, and I hope you did too. I've been looking at some other spaces, and recently sent an email to the armory folks (on 14th/mission, owned by kink.com). Apparently they have a huge space, and maybe they would let us give tours....Thanks to everyone who came out and ate, thanks to all the vendors that made delicious food, it was a good night. Here are a couple pics from the market, in case you didn't get to come. If you are interested in being a vendor at next months market, look here for info on the next sample day. If you're not on our list yet, and want to get a note about the next market, please sign up to be a member here. See you next month!

Iso

wild kitchen

Foraging Mussels

I love collecting mussels. These pics are from a couple weeks ago when me and my girlfriend went down south. Was a lot of fun, mix of work and play.  We actually got approached by a fish and game officer, so I was happy that I bought us both fishing licenses. Its worth it if you are going to collect mussels, because the fines are pretty intense. The limit for mussels is 10 lbs a person, and you’re only allowed to use your hands to pry them off (so no knives allowed!) Go at low or minus tide. Have fun! Things to bring:

Gloves

Bucket

Fishing license

I just heard an interesting story, that mussel fisherman down south used to save the threads from the mussel "beards" and make gloves out of them. Pretty cool, and makes sense, they are some strong threads.

SF Underground Market

February 5th Underground Market Vendors

The market is at SomArts, at 934 Brannan St, in SF. Starts at 11am, ends at 11:00pm. DAY VENDORS:

Sasonao latin Cuisine  --  Tony Ulloa  --  Nicaraguan cuisine Fresh Bite Bakery  --  Cindy Tsai Schultz/Terry Betts  --  http://www.freshbitebaking.com/ --  baked goods Todd Masonis  --  bean-to-bar chocolate mo foods  --  Caterina Rindi/Jae Brim  --   www.mo-foods.com --  foraged/gleaned pickles & preserves Epicurean Solutions  --  Moira Tocatium  --  Veggie Deli Salads Starter Bakery  --  Brian M. Wood  --  www.starterbakery.com --  bakery Three Bowls  --  Indu Kline  --  Ambrosia - food of the gods James Saltzman's Smoked Bacon  --  James Saltzman  --  smoked bacon & brownies Rokas/Kelli Armonas  --  honey & mushrooms Beet Freaks  --  Sharon Salmon  --  pickles Earth Alchemy Chocolate  --  Susan Marjanovic  --  earthalchemychocolate.squarespace.com/ --  raw herbal chocolate Bread Project  --  Diedre Linburn  --  chocolate chip cookies The Chai Cart  --  Paawin  --  hot chai & chai packets Canvas Underground  --  Peter Jackson   www.canvasunderground.com --  meats & gumbo Raja Sen  --  dal and balsamic vinaigrette Quackery  --  Scott/Ramona  --  kombucha Ben Sawicki  --  flavored kale chips & veggie curry Josey Baker  --  bread Dehesa  --  Edward Lekwart  --  artisan sausages Tamales By Rudy  --  Rudy Santiago  --  burrito-sized tamales German Bread  --  Katrin Staugaard/Daniela Busse  --  traditional German bread & foraged plum jams Le Chaudron Magique  --  Isabelle Sin  --  seasonal jams Kirsten Roehler  --  seasoned goat cheese, seasoned salts & pickled lemons Yaella Frankel  --  chutneys, relishes & salsas Telegraph Hill Coffee Roasters  --  David Oliver  --   www.telegraphcoffeesf.com --  coffee

NIGHT VENDORS:

Flosa Creamery  --  Jordan Grosser  --  bacon-wrapped mochi CoCoTutti  --  Elyce Zahn  --  http://cocotutti.com/ --  caramels, chocolates Jilli  --  Will Schrom and Jacky Hayward--  www.jilli-icecream.com --  sarsaparilla and raw ice cream! Whole Beast Supper Club  --  Kevin Bunnell  --  pig products Lan Kulapaditharom  --  Tawainese: beef/chicken slider & shrimp wonton Lelajay's Ridiculously Good Gluten-FREE  --  Lila Akhzar  --  gluten-free brownie bites Aaron's Almost Better Than Sex Cake  --  Aaron Keller  --  chocolate oreo-toffee cake & beer dogs Sidesaddle Kitchen  --  Laura Miller  --  www.facebook.com/SidesaddleKitchen --  raw vegan pies Mama’s African Kitchen   --  Dupe Bello  --  traditional African curry dishes JazzyB's Recipez  --  Jasmine Ball  --  mac n’ cheese-veggie & w/pork belly A Humble Plate  --  Rathsamee Ly  --  Laotian Food Saucy Dumplings  --  Michael Lee  --  pork & vegetarian dumplings Hella Vegan Eats  --  Sylvester Chitica/James Raushenberg  --  www.hellaveganeats.com --  Vegan deliciousness Luscious Liquids  --  Kathy DeWitt/Tracee Raptis  --  elixirs and such Sajen Foods  --  Morisinah Katimin  --  Gado-gado & satay burger w/peanut sauce (Indonesian street food) Laksa Pho King  --  Stephen Backer  --  Vietnamese Pho & Malaysian Curry Laksa The Occasional Macaron Shop  --  Katie/George Wang  --  www.facebook.com/macaronshop --  macarons Angry Man Eats  --  Paul Midgen  --  chicken & waffles Tamale Nation  --  Alison Greenwood/Maria  --  tamales & empanadas Eric Eberman  --  veggie empanadas Bake It Banana  -- Courtney Dougherty  --  banana desserts

OUTDOOR NIGHT VENDORS: Kitchen Sidecar  --  Katie Kwan  --  www.kitchensidecar.com --  banh mi burger Pizza Hacker  --  Jeff Krupman  --  pizza The Grilled Cheese Guy  --  Michael Davidson  --  grilled cheese Sataysfied  --  Feldo Nartapura  --  www.sataysfied.com --  Indonesian satays Boffo Cart  --  Rhasaan Fernandez/Crystal Williams  -- hot sandwiches & paninis Panguita  --  Andre Joffroy  -- beer battered fish tacos & beef tostadas

Uncategorized

Pics from July Wild Kitchen Dinners

Here are our favorite pics from our last couple Wild Kitchen dinners by our amazing photographer Robin Jolin (robinjolin.com), who always makes the food look even more delicious than in real life. This dinner was eight courses, and featured a lot of great summer fruit, as well as some forageables from the coast and inland.  Thanks to all the people who came, it was a great crowd, and especially to the people who bartered such great stuff. Remember, we're always looking for people to barter skills, kitchen equipment, massages and the like. If you haven't checked them out yet, and want to get emailed when they're happening, sign up in the subscribe box on the homepage at foragesf.com. Thanks

Iso

Uncategorized

July SF Underground Market Full Vendor List

Here's a list of all the vendors that will be at this Saturdays SF Underground Market at SomArts (934 Brannan St). We've got some really great stuff this time around! Remember, you can get a ticket online, or just show up at the door, but either way, you need to become a member here. See you Saturday!

  • Tony (Anthony) Ulloa   -- empanadas and plantain chips -- Sasonao latin Cuisine
  • Julia Lazar and Tom Franco  -- 23Monkeytree -- santosha kombucha
  • Maryanne Cooper (Bendotoff)   -- Foodie Fix -- ice cream
  • Amber Shigg   -- Golden Roots Catering -- vegan and veggie cuisine
  • Lori Lovejoy  -- Laar's whole-grain treats -- whole grain healthy cookies
  • Rebecca Dyas & Rebecca Hardberger   -- R&R Italian Sauces -- Italian pasta sauces
  • Steve Green   -- Dr. Steve's Magic -- veggie & fruit juices and cakes
  • Natalia Anguiano   -- Dona Lucy Salsa -- salsas & moles
  • Caterina Rindi & Jae Brim   -- mo foods -- lemonade, marmalade and sabayon
  • Denise Leung   -- mmmeat! -- asian style carnitas
  • Leah melnik   -- De Lovely -- BBQ glazes and granola bars -- http://delovelydinners.com/meet_the_chef
  • Emmy Moore & Jonah Susskind   -- Emmy's -- pickles & jams
  • Steve Jakubowics & Sarah Choi   -- Nonesuch Bakery -- baked goods --http://nonesuchbakery.blogspot.com/
  • Katie/George Wang   -- The Macaron Shop -- macaroons
  • Susan Marjanovic   -- Earth Alchemy Chocolate -- chocolates-- http://earthalchemychocolate.squarespace.com/
  • Jackie Woods   -- Monet's Cakes -- cupcakes -- http://twitter.com/MonetsCakes
  • Leslie Quinn   -- Zukra Bakery -- gluten-free treats
  • Robert Minasian   -- California Cane & Fruit Co. -- cane juice -- http://californiacaneandfruit.com/
  • Sheryl Leaf & George Gumulsinski    -- biscotti & granola
  • Marisa Williams   -- Dulceria -- cooies & cakes
  • Alice Wilson   -- peach BBQ sauce
  • Amie Bailey/Angie Serna   -- Sugartit Kitchens -- baked goods, pickles & jams
  • Rebecca Ets-Hokin   -- http://www.gorebecca.com/ -- honey
  • Jessica Hubler   -- Sweet Francisco -- sweets -- http://www.sweetfrancisco.com/
  • Cork Marcheschi   -- Red Dot Eats -- carmel-almond-chocolate turtles and filled buns
  • Loris Matterson   -- JERK. (Matterson's Authentic Jamaican Cuisine) -- jerked chicken and bread
  • Erin Wade/Allison Arevalo  --  Homeroom (formerly Little Mac) -- mac n’ cheese
  • Lisette  -- Evil Jerk Cart -- Authentic Jamaiican Cuisine -- http://www.eviljerkcart.com/
  • Paula Tejeda   -- Chile Lindo Empenadas -- empenadas -- http://chilelindoempanadas.com/
  • Keith Agoada   -- Empenada de mi pueblo -- empenadas -- http://lucinaskitchen.com/
  • Roberto Mercado & Katelyn Murdock  -- La Chureria  -- churros w/dipping sauce
  • Emilianna Ceribelli  -- Chef Mili -- French & Brazilian treats -- http://www.chefmili.com/
  • Ahram   -- Ahram Namu Kimchi -- kimchi topped hotdogs
  • Rathsamee Ly   -- A Humble Plate -- Laotian food -- http://twitter.com/ahumbleplate
  • Van Dao  -- Biscuit Boy -- biscuits
  • Will Schrom --   sarsaparilla and raw ice cream
  • Kathy DeWitt/Tracee Raptis   -- Luscious Liquids -- elixirs and mixers
  • Zach Watson   -- Dr. Watson's Sausages for Days -- sausages
  • Rebecca Cheng  -- ??
  • Sarah Dvorak  -- Mission Cheese -- racellette -- http://missioncheese.blogspot.com/2009/09/comte.html
  • Katie Kwan  -- KitchenSidecar -- banh mi burger -- http://twitter.com/kitchensidecar
  • Clay & Robin Knight  --  salsa
  • Ron Escopete  -- Uncle Clem's Food -- chicken & rice -- http://twitter.com/uncleclemsfood
  • Andrew Baber   -- Chu it up -- Gochujang sauce and hot Korean dishes -- http://www.chuitup.com/
  • Becky Spencer   -- urban preserves -- jams -- http://www.facebook.com/urbanpreserves?v=info
  • Moira Tocatium   -- Epicurean Solutions -- deli salads
  • Jeff Krupman   -- PizzaHacker --  oven baked pizza -- http://www.thepizzahacker.com/
  • Brandon Yee   -- pulled pork sandwiches and briscuit
  • Michael Christie/Abby Ward  -- SF Delicious Catering -- French Street Food -- http://www.sfdelicious.com/
  • Seema Hamid  -- Rotee Brunch -- Pakistani | German | American Fusion Brunch -- http://roteebrunch.blogspot.com/2010/04/rotee-brunch-menu.html
  • Genny McAuley  -- Nanny's Mustard -- mustard
  • Laura Miller   -- Sidesaddle Kitchen -- raw vegan cookies -- http://twitter.com/SidesaddleKitch
  • Katy McLean  -- Christopher David Macaron -- macaroons -- http://christopherdavidmacaron.com/
  • Chris Chiang  -- Auntie Priscilla's Gourmet -- curry dumplings
  • James Hall  -- Raw Daddy (JimmiJam) -- raw food cones -- http://www.rawdaddyfoods.com/
  • Branden Herrell  --   burgers w/special sauce
  • Angela Montemayor  -- Angela's Blackbottom cakes -- cupcakes
  • Molly de vries  -- The Fabric Society -- textile carriers -- http://ambataliafabrics.blogspot.com/
  • Devon Fenimore  -- Bakesale Fruit Crisps -- fruit crisps -- http://devonfenimore.com/test2/

Uncategorized

Eat Real

[gallery columns="2"] My Eat Real marathon weekend of sea bean proselytizing is over.  It was great to get out and talk to people about what we're up to, and really exciting to see how into people are.  Foraging is often a lonely pursuit, and I get the feeling that people are often a bit confused about just what it is we're trying to do at forageSF, so getting face to face with people and answering questions about what we're about was great.  So great in fact that I'm going to start a push to get into some local farmers markets. It was originally my intention, but the focus moved a bit over the last year, and it got put on the back burner.  The problem with selling wild food in a certified market (meaning that everyone there is the primary producer) is that no one actually produces wild food.  We forage it, so we are as close to producers as any human gets, but not close enough.  It's a pretty funny situation to be in, what makes the food so interesting to me and to others is the exact reason it can't be sold.  I talked to a couple farmers market managers who seemed to think we could find some common ground, so I'm optimistic.  So look for us at your farmers market soon!

Recipes

Naturally fermented seabean pickles

all in a row

I'm convinced that seabeans make a great pickle.  They're already salty, crunchy, so small that the pickling mixture soaks through them pretty quickly, but so far my experiments have not been super successful...too much vinegar, not enough salt, too much garlic, not enough dill.  I'm starting from scratch, and this time, am using the naturally fermented method.

Rather than vinegar and pickling spices, this method uses only salt,water, garlic.  Dill and other flavorings can included to taste, but this time I used only the above. Vinegar free pickles are the traditional way of making pickles. Rather than trapping out bacteria via vinegar (basically making an antiseptic brine where nothing can live), naturally fermented pickles actually grow their own beneficial bacteria.  This serves several purposes. 1. it makes them deliciously tart, 2. it keeps out bad bacteria, and 3. the pickles are actually good for you. The same kind of good bacteria that lives in yogurt (Lactobacillus) grows in these pickles, helping your digestion and immune system.    All good things.  Without further ado, here's what I did today....

What I used:

1 cup Sea Salt

11 cups filtered h20

2 cloves garlic

1.5 lbs sea beans (also known as pickleweed or samphire)

My trusty Makers notebook ( a gift for being in the makers faire)

gallon jar (mine was not widemouthed, but thats ideal if you have one)

my stuff

What I did:

1.Cleaned the jar with a splash of boiling water

2. Mixed 11 Cups water and 1 Cup Sea Salt (old wives tale says that you should be able to float an egg in the brine...I generally find old wives to be right, and this brine passes that test)

my jar

3.took out egg.

4.added sea beans and garlic (I didn't have any dill, but I'm sure that will make it that much more delicious)

5.the reason for using a wide mouth jar is that you need a way to keep the veggies underneath the brining solution while it sits.  The best way to do this is to get a plate that just fits into the jar, and use a rock to weigh it down. My jar has a tapered lid, so I couldn't do that.  My solution (a very elegant one I gleaned from a woman at the makers faire...Rachel I think (sorry if you're reading this) ) is to fill a plastic bag with water, seal the top, and squeeze that through the jar. It acts to keep the seabeans down, pretty cool.  It's really not ideal, because you don't necessarily want plastic sitting on your food for that long, but works in a pinch.

6. that's it! cover the jar, and let it sit in a dark place for a while. Check them after 1,2,3 weeks, this way you can taste as the flavor develops. These should keep for about a year.  I'll update in a week, see how the experiment is holding up. Make sure to keep track of what you did, so you can change/repeat it next time.

IMG_0763
IMG_0761

Uncategorized

Chp 1. Mushrooms

The first time I ever foraged wild mushrooms was up at my dad's house in Willow Creek CA.  I, perhaps much like you, had always understood in some peripheral way that wild mushrooms come from the woods.  They are called wild, and therefore not cultivated.  It follows that something that is not cultivated needs to be found, so someone must do the finding.  If asked, I would have given that reply. Who these unseen seekers were, where they did their seeking, who they did if for, how they learned, who they sold mushrooms to when found, were all a mystery.  In northern California, these questions are not so academic. Mushrooms are everywhere. Boletes, Black trumpets, Morel, Chanterelle, Yellow foot, Hedgehog (so named for their spiky underside), Matsutake, Snaggle tooth....that last ones a joke, but I wouldn't be surprised to find that as a local name for some under-appreciated fungus. The mushrooms I mentioned are only a fraction of what is bought for retail sale, and mushrooms for retail sale are only a fraction of edible fungus that's out in the woods.  There are many others that aren't available in stores.  Mycophobia (fear of mushrooms) runs deep in our culture, so people are not too keen to try a fungus that isn't already popular.  Although I for one disagree with much of the hype around mushroom danger (many more people die from eating eggs every year), there are mushrooms that shouldn't be eaten. The death cap is one such mushroom.  Small, white, unassuming, the death cap purportedly has a mild sweet taste (this from those that have eaten it and survived).  Eating half of one mushroom can kill you. TBC....

Uncategorized

Local Fish?

My search for local fish to put in the CSF box took me down to the docks today, where I met Rolando at peir 45 fish, Mitch at Aloha, and Ernie the herring fisherman. The basic response I got when asking what kind of local fish I could expect to buy was a slight chuckle, followed by a diatribe into the reasons that no fish comes from the bay area.  I expected (living in a port town), that I would be presented with a grand list of bay area catch, rotating seasonally. I was wrong. Apparently almost none of the fish we buy comes from local sources, not because it's not there, but because the regulations are such that almost no one is allowed to fish it.  Now I'm all for regulations where they make sense, but regulations that create a situation where it people are forced to import a resource that is available locally seem fishy (punny I know). Granted, I'm a bit of a newb on this issue, and I doubt fisherman and fish wholesalers are the only people with something to say on this issue, but still...crazy. I won't be able to put bay area fish in my CSF, not because they aren't there, but because the powers that be would prefer I get it from Australia.  So remember that next time you go out to your favorite bayside bistro, chances are the fish you are eating are not from our shores. Pelicans...who knew?

Come sunday I'm going to be reeling in herring on this boat!

p.s. got an invite to go out on a herring boat sunday night!!

Uncategorized

mclaren park

After a 3 hour adventure of taking wrong bus after wrong bus finally ended, I arrived in mclaren park. What a great place! just outside of the mission, spend 10 minutes on the bus (if you take the right one) and suddenly you crest a hill to this amazing view of the bay.  The bus drops you off on what seems like a highway, but its right next to a field brimming with wild radish greens ( that I put into a potato salad for the million fishes potluck that night) , some minors lettuce, and one mushroom (that I couldnt identify, but was surely an amanita, which is code for don't ever eat).  As I filled my bag full of radish greens, I did begin to get some strange looks, but I'm used to that.[gallery]

Uncategorized

Limoncello Extravaganza!

img_0118 There seem to be two schools of thought on homemade limoncello.

1. The " spend 2 hours of your life painstakingly peeling the skin off 20 lemons, (and just the skin, avoiding the white pith, which makes the drink bitter), and soak them in the liquor."   This seems likely to end in a bitter hatred of ever making limoncello again, as well as carpal tunnel

2. Wrap the lemons in twine, and hang them above the alcohol.

Seems obvious which one to choose. Although I took a bit from both camps, peeling one lemon and putting the peel into the jar. I figure you cant have too much lemon.  An added bonus of the hanging method is that you have this cool trapeze hanging lemon contraption around the house to look at.

So this is how to do it.

What you need:

-lemons (preferably foraged from a friends backyard, mine came courtesy of Asiya Wadud and John Collins)

-Vodka or everclear (which is much harder to come by foraged, although one of my friends has been talking about making a still, so maybe the next batch)

-A jar with a sealable lid big enough for the liquor with a good amount of headroom

-String or twine ( I wouldn't use anything made of plastic, because it seems like the fumes might eat through it...and that's just nasty)

- 1-3 cups granulated sugar

-2 cups water

To do:

1. Pour liquor into jar

img_0112

2. Use a veggie peeler to take  the skin off one lemon, being sure not to get any of the white pith.  Like I said, this is easier said than done, but its only one lemon so doesn't take long.

3. Throw peels into alcohol.img_0115

4. Hang the lemons. This is the hard part. You need to devise a way to wrap the lemons up in twine in such a way that they will hang and not fall into the liquor.  The second option is to buy cheesecloth and hang them in that, but I like the aesthetic of the lemons hanging.done

6. Close the jar and wrap the excess string around the top of the jar.  Again, making sure the lemons are not touching the liquor, and tape the seal closed.

7. Leave for a month in a dark place, during which time the fumes from the liquor will suck the essence from the lemon, which I think is pretty cool.

8. We'll talk about that on feb 20....

lemon

full disclosure: I would like to give credit where credit is due, I used recipes from foodtv.ca as well as patty.vox.com to create this wonderful beverage.