forage SF

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July SF Underground Market Full Vendor List

Here's a list of all the vendors that will be at this Saturdays SF Underground Market at SomArts (934 Brannan St). We've got some really great stuff this time around! Remember, you can get a ticket online, or just show up at the door, but either way, you need to become a member here. See you Saturday!

  • Tony (Anthony) Ulloa   -- empanadas and plantain chips -- Sasonao latin Cuisine
  • Julia Lazar and Tom Franco  -- 23Monkeytree -- santosha kombucha
  • Maryanne Cooper (Bendotoff)   -- Foodie Fix -- ice cream
  • Amber Shigg   -- Golden Roots Catering -- vegan and veggie cuisine
  • Lori Lovejoy  -- Laar's whole-grain treats -- whole grain healthy cookies
  • Rebecca Dyas & Rebecca Hardberger   -- R&R Italian Sauces -- Italian pasta sauces
  • Steve Green   -- Dr. Steve's Magic -- veggie & fruit juices and cakes
  • Natalia Anguiano   -- Dona Lucy Salsa -- salsas & moles
  • Caterina Rindi & Jae Brim   -- mo foods -- lemonade, marmalade and sabayon
  • Denise Leung   -- mmmeat! -- asian style carnitas
  • Leah melnik   -- De Lovely -- BBQ glazes and granola bars -- http://delovelydinners.com/meet_the_chef
  • Emmy Moore & Jonah Susskind   -- Emmy's -- pickles & jams
  • Steve Jakubowics & Sarah Choi   -- Nonesuch Bakery -- baked goods --http://nonesuchbakery.blogspot.com/
  • Katie/George Wang   -- The Macaron Shop -- macaroons
  • Susan Marjanovic   -- Earth Alchemy Chocolate -- chocolates-- http://earthalchemychocolate.squarespace.com/
  • Jackie Woods   -- Monet's Cakes -- cupcakes -- http://twitter.com/MonetsCakes
  • Leslie Quinn   -- Zukra Bakery -- gluten-free treats
  • Robert Minasian   -- California Cane & Fruit Co. -- cane juice -- http://californiacaneandfruit.com/
  • Sheryl Leaf & George Gumulsinski    -- biscotti & granola
  • Marisa Williams   -- Dulceria -- cooies & cakes
  • Alice Wilson   -- peach BBQ sauce
  • Amie Bailey/Angie Serna   -- Sugartit Kitchens -- baked goods, pickles & jams
  • Rebecca Ets-Hokin   -- http://www.gorebecca.com/ -- honey
  • Jessica Hubler   -- Sweet Francisco -- sweets -- http://www.sweetfrancisco.com/
  • Cork Marcheschi   -- Red Dot Eats -- carmel-almond-chocolate turtles and filled buns
  • Loris Matterson   -- JERK. (Matterson's Authentic Jamaican Cuisine) -- jerked chicken and bread
  • Erin Wade/Allison Arevalo  --  Homeroom (formerly Little Mac) -- mac n’ cheese
  • Lisette  -- Evil Jerk Cart -- Authentic Jamaiican Cuisine -- http://www.eviljerkcart.com/
  • Paula Tejeda   -- Chile Lindo Empenadas -- empenadas -- http://chilelindoempanadas.com/
  • Keith Agoada   -- Empenada de mi pueblo -- empenadas -- http://lucinaskitchen.com/
  • Roberto Mercado & Katelyn Murdock  -- La Chureria  -- churros w/dipping sauce
  • Emilianna Ceribelli  -- Chef Mili -- French & Brazilian treats -- http://www.chefmili.com/
  • Ahram   -- Ahram Namu Kimchi -- kimchi topped hotdogs
  • Rathsamee Ly   -- A Humble Plate -- Laotian food -- http://twitter.com/ahumbleplate
  • Van Dao  -- Biscuit Boy -- biscuits
  • Will Schrom --   sarsaparilla and raw ice cream
  • Kathy DeWitt/Tracee Raptis   -- Luscious Liquids -- elixirs and mixers
  • Zach Watson   -- Dr. Watson's Sausages for Days -- sausages
  • Rebecca Cheng  -- ??
  • Sarah Dvorak  -- Mission Cheese -- racellette -- http://missioncheese.blogspot.com/2009/09/comte.html
  • Katie Kwan  -- KitchenSidecar -- banh mi burger -- http://twitter.com/kitchensidecar
  • Clay & Robin Knight  --  salsa
  • Ron Escopete  -- Uncle Clem's Food -- chicken & rice -- http://twitter.com/uncleclemsfood
  • Andrew Baber   -- Chu it up -- Gochujang sauce and hot Korean dishes -- http://www.chuitup.com/
  • Becky Spencer   -- urban preserves -- jams -- http://www.facebook.com/urbanpreserves?v=info
  • Moira Tocatium   -- Epicurean Solutions -- deli salads
  • Jeff Krupman   -- PizzaHacker --  oven baked pizza -- http://www.thepizzahacker.com/
  • Brandon Yee   -- pulled pork sandwiches and briscuit
  • Michael Christie/Abby Ward  -- SF Delicious Catering -- French Street Food -- http://www.sfdelicious.com/
  • Seema Hamid  -- Rotee Brunch -- Pakistani | German | American Fusion Brunch -- http://roteebrunch.blogspot.com/2010/04/rotee-brunch-menu.html
  • Genny McAuley  -- Nanny's Mustard -- mustard
  • Laura Miller   -- Sidesaddle Kitchen -- raw vegan cookies -- http://twitter.com/SidesaddleKitch
  • Katy McLean  -- Christopher David Macaron -- macaroons -- http://christopherdavidmacaron.com/
  • Chris Chiang  -- Auntie Priscilla's Gourmet -- curry dumplings
  • James Hall  -- Raw Daddy (JimmiJam) -- raw food cones -- http://www.rawdaddyfoods.com/
  • Branden Herrell  --   burgers w/special sauce
  • Angela Montemayor  -- Angela's Blackbottom cakes -- cupcakes
  • Molly de vries  -- The Fabric Society -- textile carriers -- http://ambataliafabrics.blogspot.com/
  • Devon Fenimore  -- Bakesale Fruit Crisps -- fruit crisps -- http://devonfenimore.com/test2/

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What it means to think about food

I recently heard an interview of an author who's written a book called "where locavores get it wrong...".  His basic thesis is that for someone who is concerned with the carbon footprint of their food, local is often not the right choice. It often is of course, but sometimes it makes more sense to import snap peas from Uganda than it does to walk down to the farmers market.  I guess this is true. I imagine the man did his research, as he was being interviewed on a show I trust, so I'm going to  take it as a given that he's not lying. So that begs the question...why eat local?  If we can get snap peas year round from disparate corners of the globe, always snappy and fresh (or at least fresh-ish), and at the same time reduce our carbon footprint, why all this talk of eating local? The answer that I've come to (full disclosure, Michael Pollan was also on the show, and he had a similar idea to the one I'm about to espouse, but I swear I thought it before he said it on the show) is that local food is about more than food. Wild food is about more than food.  People love wild foods, they're clearly delicious, often more nutritious (and I believe if the author had done his research on foraged foods he would have found they are much more carbon efficient, but put that aside for a second), but I'm not sure that's the main reason people love them. To me wild food is almost more about the connection to the place I live. I've lived in San Francisco for two years now (just had my anniversary), and I feel more a part of this place that almost anywhere else on earth.  I've explored more of the Bay than I have in VT, and I grew up there. I meet people every day that are interested in what I'm doing, and want to be involved. I know that a week after the first rains I'm going to mushroom forage, I know who I'm going with, I know what I will (or should) find. I'm honestly looking forward to going up to Mendecino next week to collect acorns, and making plans for the best way to get to the wild onions before the landscapers get them next spring. I feel a part of this place, and that has all sprung from my interest in the foods of this place.  I throw dinners that have become some of the most memorable meals of my life. I know chefs all over the city, and always know if I have a question about the food business I can ask Ian at Far West Fungi.  The people I call friends are the people who are actively working towards changing the way America eats. Creative people who, through their creativity, inspire people to see the world in a different way.

Local food is about much more it's carbon footprint. That's important of course, but what the local food movement is really about goes beyond the eating. It goes to a connection with the place you live, and the people that make that place important. When you buy a mushroom from a forager (or a farmer), you support that person, their community, expand your own community, and get to know the place you call home just a little bit better.

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August CSF

boxpic This months box:

Dried Porcini and Morel Mushrooms (Mendocino/Humboldt Valley)

Dried Mushrooms, left to refresh in water for about 20 minutes, can be cooked just like fresh. It takes about 10 lbs of fresh wild mushrooms to make 1 lb dried.  Drying actually concentrates the flavor of many mushrooms, such as the bolete.  The Boletus edulis mushroom (bolete) was first described in 1783 by the French botanist Pierre Bulliard and still bears its original name. The Porcini, or King Bolete, is always an exciting find in California since they’re rare and delicious. Porcini are great sautéed with a little (or a lot) of butter.

Orange and Foraged Lemon Juice

Foraged in our own backyard, these lemons were rescued from certain rotting.  We got some fresh squeezed OJ and added foraged lemon juice to give it a good sour bite.

Sea beans (Bolinas)

Pickle weed is a small succulent, with leaves that are waxy on the outside and full of moisture on the inside. Its leaves are long, thin, and round, like little fingers. Pickleweed flowers between April and September, but its tiny yellow flowers can only be seen upon careful examination. Pickle weed grows in the low- to middle-tide zone in the marsh, which means that it gets covered up by water some of the time.  It’s delicious fresh as a garnish, or if you want to get creative in the early morning hours, check out the recipe below.

Wild Foraged Bay Leaves

The very same bay laurel leaves that you see (and smell) all over California, can be used in cooking. The aroma is a bit stronger than store bought, so use sparingly in your favorite soups.

Wild Foraged Blackberries

That’s right, collected just yesterday…they’re delicious.  We had to exercise some serious self control not to eat them all as we picked.  These blackberries come from Mendocino county.

Seabeans Sauteed with onions

This week we wanted to give you an idea of a good way to cook those seabeans you get so often in your box. Here they are, sautéed with some onions, garlic, pepper, and just a pinch of sugar to cut the saltiness. Hope you like them.

Wild Foraged Mint

Use this just like regular mint, the taste is a bit more intense with the wild variety.