california

Edible seaweeds

Kombu Seaweed: The Umami Superfood!

 

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Sure, when it’s in the sea it might not look very appetizing, but several types of seaweed are delicious when prepared properly. Not only that, but seaweed is packed with nutrients. Take the edible kelp known as kombu, for example. Kombu can be found right off the coast, and there are literally kelp forests packed full of it. Kombu is known for its ability to improve digestion. Packed with amino acids and glutamic acid, eating kombu helps your body break down foods easier and minimizes both intestinal gas and discomfort.

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Sea vegetables like kombu may also help prevent cancer, thanks to their anti-inflammatory benefits. Kombu contains iron, which is a vital mineral for healthy cells, hair, nails, skin, and more. It’s common for people to have an iron-deficient diet, which leads to fatigue and other anemic symptoms. Adding kombu into your diet is a great way to ensure that you’re getting enough.


Kombu is actually the highest in iodine out of all edible seaweeds. In fact, it’s one of the most iodine-rich foods out there. Why is this important? Well, iodine improves thyroid function and is an essential mineral for healthy hormone production. Our bodies do not naturally produce iodine, meaning it’s essential to eat iodine-rich foods like kombu in order to maintain a healthy thyroid.

Lastly, kombu contains a sulfated polysaccharide known as fucoidan, which has been proven to stave off cell inflammation. Therefore, researchers suggest that eating kombu may be a possible treatment for the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. And we haven’t even mentioned all of the vitamins, calcium, and proteins that are found in seaweed! Now that you know all about why you should eat kombu, let’s go over a delicious recipe for you to enjoy.

 

Kombu Dashi (Stock):

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•   Wipe down the surface of kombu, but DO NOT rinse with water (which washes away the umami flavor)

•   Place the kombu into a pot of water (use around 5g of kombu per 500 ml of water)

•   Put on medium heat

•   Take kombu out right before the water begins to boil and enjoy the dashi!

Kombu is famous for its umami flavor, and it is used in Japan to make dashi, which is a soup that can also be used as cooking stock. Dashi is actually the base for many Japanese dishes, including miso soup. While several kinds of seaweeds can be used to make dashi, kombu is one of the tastiest and healthiest choices.

Once you’ve made your kombu dashi, you can store it in your fridge and heat it up when you’re in the mood for some delicious hot soup. Or, you can use it as stock to cook with. It’s an excellent stock alternative for vegetarians. Plus, its unique umami flavor is fun to experiment with and can really open up your cooking options.

 Of course, there are plenty of other ways to enjoy the taste and health benefits of kombu than dashi. Kombu can be dried, made into powder, and pickled. It’s even eaten as sashimi in Japan. So, pick up some kombu today and start enjoying its health benefits and unique flavor!

Ready to get out there and collect your own? Our Seaweed Adventures on the Sonoma coast are great for the beginner or veteran forager. Click below for dates and see you on the beach!

SF Underground Market

and it was good.

Our very special Easter/Passover Underground Market is over (to be honest it had nothing to do with either of those holidays, but glad people could take a break from feasting to come by). It was quite a success.  We had over 40 vendors, 3200 eaters (a new record), a food truck (a first), and a line down the block.  We were much more careful about capacity this time, stopping entrance at 580 (after which we only let people in when others left), and it made for a much more manageable vibe. We also set up seating outside, so people had a place to sit down and eat. I've felt bad ever since we started having the market at Public Works about the over 21 policy (this is necessary because of the kind of license Public Works has), so we set up an area outside where kids could hang out and eat without actually going into the space. We had about 10 people take advantage of it, which isn't a lot, but a start.  We lowered the number of vendors inside this time around, so people would have more space to walk, and that also improved the overall feel I thought. Overall I (in my humble opinion), thought it was a really great market.

I had a great time, and I hope you did too. I've been looking at some other spaces, and recently sent an email to the armory folks (on 14th/mission, owned by kink.com). Apparently they have a huge space, and maybe they would let us give tours....Thanks to everyone who came out and ate, thanks to all the vendors that made delicious food, it was a good night. Here are a couple pics from the market, in case you didn't get to come. If you are interested in being a vendor at next months market, look here for info on the next sample day. If you're not on our list yet, and want to get a note about the next market, please sign up to be a member here. See you next month!

Iso

wild kitchen

Foraging Mussels

I love collecting mussels. These pics are from a couple weeks ago when me and my girlfriend went down south. Was a lot of fun, mix of work and play.  We actually got approached by a fish and game officer, so I was happy that I bought us both fishing licenses. Its worth it if you are going to collect mussels, because the fines are pretty intense. The limit for mussels is 10 lbs a person, and you’re only allowed to use your hands to pry them off (so no knives allowed!) Go at low or minus tide. Have fun! Things to bring:

Gloves

Bucket

Fishing license

I just heard an interesting story, that mussel fisherman down south used to save the threads from the mussel "beards" and make gloves out of them. Pretty cool, and makes sense, they are some strong threads.

SF Underground Market

February 5th Underground Market Vendors

The market is at SomArts, at 934 Brannan St, in SF. Starts at 11am, ends at 11:00pm. DAY VENDORS:

Sasonao latin Cuisine  --  Tony Ulloa  --  Nicaraguan cuisine Fresh Bite Bakery  --  Cindy Tsai Schultz/Terry Betts  --  http://www.freshbitebaking.com/ --  baked goods Todd Masonis  --  bean-to-bar chocolate mo foods  --  Caterina Rindi/Jae Brim  --   www.mo-foods.com --  foraged/gleaned pickles & preserves Epicurean Solutions  --  Moira Tocatium  --  Veggie Deli Salads Starter Bakery  --  Brian M. Wood  --  www.starterbakery.com --  bakery Three Bowls  --  Indu Kline  --  Ambrosia - food of the gods James Saltzman's Smoked Bacon  --  James Saltzman  --  smoked bacon & brownies Rokas/Kelli Armonas  --  honey & mushrooms Beet Freaks  --  Sharon Salmon  --  pickles Earth Alchemy Chocolate  --  Susan Marjanovic  --  earthalchemychocolate.squarespace.com/ --  raw herbal chocolate Bread Project  --  Diedre Linburn  --  chocolate chip cookies The Chai Cart  --  Paawin  --  hot chai & chai packets Canvas Underground  --  Peter Jackson   www.canvasunderground.com --  meats & gumbo Raja Sen  --  dal and balsamic vinaigrette Quackery  --  Scott/Ramona  --  kombucha Ben Sawicki  --  flavored kale chips & veggie curry Josey Baker  --  bread Dehesa  --  Edward Lekwart  --  artisan sausages Tamales By Rudy  --  Rudy Santiago  --  burrito-sized tamales German Bread  --  Katrin Staugaard/Daniela Busse  --  traditional German bread & foraged plum jams Le Chaudron Magique  --  Isabelle Sin  --  seasonal jams Kirsten Roehler  --  seasoned goat cheese, seasoned salts & pickled lemons Yaella Frankel  --  chutneys, relishes & salsas Telegraph Hill Coffee Roasters  --  David Oliver  --   www.telegraphcoffeesf.com --  coffee

NIGHT VENDORS:

Flosa Creamery  --  Jordan Grosser  --  bacon-wrapped mochi CoCoTutti  --  Elyce Zahn  --  http://cocotutti.com/ --  caramels, chocolates Jilli  --  Will Schrom and Jacky Hayward--  www.jilli-icecream.com --  sarsaparilla and raw ice cream! Whole Beast Supper Club  --  Kevin Bunnell  --  pig products Lan Kulapaditharom  --  Tawainese: beef/chicken slider & shrimp wonton Lelajay's Ridiculously Good Gluten-FREE  --  Lila Akhzar  --  gluten-free brownie bites Aaron's Almost Better Than Sex Cake  --  Aaron Keller  --  chocolate oreo-toffee cake & beer dogs Sidesaddle Kitchen  --  Laura Miller  --  www.facebook.com/SidesaddleKitchen --  raw vegan pies Mama’s African Kitchen   --  Dupe Bello  --  traditional African curry dishes JazzyB's Recipez  --  Jasmine Ball  --  mac n’ cheese-veggie & w/pork belly A Humble Plate  --  Rathsamee Ly  --  Laotian Food Saucy Dumplings  --  Michael Lee  --  pork & vegetarian dumplings Hella Vegan Eats  --  Sylvester Chitica/James Raushenberg  --  www.hellaveganeats.com --  Vegan deliciousness Luscious Liquids  --  Kathy DeWitt/Tracee Raptis  --  elixirs and such Sajen Foods  --  Morisinah Katimin  --  Gado-gado & satay burger w/peanut sauce (Indonesian street food) Laksa Pho King  --  Stephen Backer  --  Vietnamese Pho & Malaysian Curry Laksa The Occasional Macaron Shop  --  Katie/George Wang  --  www.facebook.com/macaronshop --  macarons Angry Man Eats  --  Paul Midgen  --  chicken & waffles Tamale Nation  --  Alison Greenwood/Maria  --  tamales & empanadas Eric Eberman  --  veggie empanadas Bake It Banana  -- Courtney Dougherty  --  banana desserts

OUTDOOR NIGHT VENDORS: Kitchen Sidecar  --  Katie Kwan  --  www.kitchensidecar.com --  banh mi burger Pizza Hacker  --  Jeff Krupman  --  pizza The Grilled Cheese Guy  --  Michael Davidson  --  grilled cheese Sataysfied  --  Feldo Nartapura  --  www.sataysfied.com --  Indonesian satays Boffo Cart  --  Rhasaan Fernandez/Crystal Williams  -- hot sandwiches & paninis Panguita  --  Andre Joffroy  -- beer battered fish tacos & beef tostadas

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Pics from July Wild Kitchen Dinners

Here are our favorite pics from our last couple Wild Kitchen dinners by our amazing photographer Robin Jolin (robinjolin.com), who always makes the food look even more delicious than in real life. This dinner was eight courses, and featured a lot of great summer fruit, as well as some forageables from the coast and inland.  Thanks to all the people who came, it was a great crowd, and especially to the people who bartered such great stuff. Remember, we're always looking for people to barter skills, kitchen equipment, massages and the like. If you haven't checked them out yet, and want to get emailed when they're happening, sign up in the subscribe box on the homepage at foragesf.com. Thanks

Iso

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July SF Underground Market Full Vendor List

Here's a list of all the vendors that will be at this Saturdays SF Underground Market at SomArts (934 Brannan St). We've got some really great stuff this time around! Remember, you can get a ticket online, or just show up at the door, but either way, you need to become a member here. See you Saturday!

  • Tony (Anthony) Ulloa   -- empanadas and plantain chips -- Sasonao latin Cuisine
  • Julia Lazar and Tom Franco  -- 23Monkeytree -- santosha kombucha
  • Maryanne Cooper (Bendotoff)   -- Foodie Fix -- ice cream
  • Amber Shigg   -- Golden Roots Catering -- vegan and veggie cuisine
  • Lori Lovejoy  -- Laar's whole-grain treats -- whole grain healthy cookies
  • Rebecca Dyas & Rebecca Hardberger   -- R&R Italian Sauces -- Italian pasta sauces
  • Steve Green   -- Dr. Steve's Magic -- veggie & fruit juices and cakes
  • Natalia Anguiano   -- Dona Lucy Salsa -- salsas & moles
  • Caterina Rindi & Jae Brim   -- mo foods -- lemonade, marmalade and sabayon
  • Denise Leung   -- mmmeat! -- asian style carnitas
  • Leah melnik   -- De Lovely -- BBQ glazes and granola bars -- http://delovelydinners.com/meet_the_chef
  • Emmy Moore & Jonah Susskind   -- Emmy's -- pickles & jams
  • Steve Jakubowics & Sarah Choi   -- Nonesuch Bakery -- baked goods --http://nonesuchbakery.blogspot.com/
  • Katie/George Wang   -- The Macaron Shop -- macaroons
  • Susan Marjanovic   -- Earth Alchemy Chocolate -- chocolates-- http://earthalchemychocolate.squarespace.com/
  • Jackie Woods   -- Monet's Cakes -- cupcakes -- http://twitter.com/MonetsCakes
  • Leslie Quinn   -- Zukra Bakery -- gluten-free treats
  • Robert Minasian   -- California Cane & Fruit Co. -- cane juice -- http://californiacaneandfruit.com/
  • Sheryl Leaf & George Gumulsinski    -- biscotti & granola
  • Marisa Williams   -- Dulceria -- cooies & cakes
  • Alice Wilson   -- peach BBQ sauce
  • Amie Bailey/Angie Serna   -- Sugartit Kitchens -- baked goods, pickles & jams
  • Rebecca Ets-Hokin   -- http://www.gorebecca.com/ -- honey
  • Jessica Hubler   -- Sweet Francisco -- sweets -- http://www.sweetfrancisco.com/
  • Cork Marcheschi   -- Red Dot Eats -- carmel-almond-chocolate turtles and filled buns
  • Loris Matterson   -- JERK. (Matterson's Authentic Jamaican Cuisine) -- jerked chicken and bread
  • Erin Wade/Allison Arevalo  --  Homeroom (formerly Little Mac) -- mac n’ cheese
  • Lisette  -- Evil Jerk Cart -- Authentic Jamaiican Cuisine -- http://www.eviljerkcart.com/
  • Paula Tejeda   -- Chile Lindo Empenadas -- empenadas -- http://chilelindoempanadas.com/
  • Keith Agoada   -- Empenada de mi pueblo -- empenadas -- http://lucinaskitchen.com/
  • Roberto Mercado & Katelyn Murdock  -- La Chureria  -- churros w/dipping sauce
  • Emilianna Ceribelli  -- Chef Mili -- French & Brazilian treats -- http://www.chefmili.com/
  • Ahram   -- Ahram Namu Kimchi -- kimchi topped hotdogs
  • Rathsamee Ly   -- A Humble Plate -- Laotian food -- http://twitter.com/ahumbleplate
  • Van Dao  -- Biscuit Boy -- biscuits
  • Will Schrom --   sarsaparilla and raw ice cream
  • Kathy DeWitt/Tracee Raptis   -- Luscious Liquids -- elixirs and mixers
  • Zach Watson   -- Dr. Watson's Sausages for Days -- sausages
  • Rebecca Cheng  -- ??
  • Sarah Dvorak  -- Mission Cheese -- racellette -- http://missioncheese.blogspot.com/2009/09/comte.html
  • Katie Kwan  -- KitchenSidecar -- banh mi burger -- http://twitter.com/kitchensidecar
  • Clay & Robin Knight  --  salsa
  • Ron Escopete  -- Uncle Clem's Food -- chicken & rice -- http://twitter.com/uncleclemsfood
  • Andrew Baber   -- Chu it up -- Gochujang sauce and hot Korean dishes -- http://www.chuitup.com/
  • Becky Spencer   -- urban preserves -- jams -- http://www.facebook.com/urbanpreserves?v=info
  • Moira Tocatium   -- Epicurean Solutions -- deli salads
  • Jeff Krupman   -- PizzaHacker --  oven baked pizza -- http://www.thepizzahacker.com/
  • Brandon Yee   -- pulled pork sandwiches and briscuit
  • Michael Christie/Abby Ward  -- SF Delicious Catering -- French Street Food -- http://www.sfdelicious.com/
  • Seema Hamid  -- Rotee Brunch -- Pakistani | German | American Fusion Brunch -- http://roteebrunch.blogspot.com/2010/04/rotee-brunch-menu.html
  • Genny McAuley  -- Nanny's Mustard -- mustard
  • Laura Miller   -- Sidesaddle Kitchen -- raw vegan cookies -- http://twitter.com/SidesaddleKitch
  • Katy McLean  -- Christopher David Macaron -- macaroons -- http://christopherdavidmacaron.com/
  • Chris Chiang  -- Auntie Priscilla's Gourmet -- curry dumplings
  • James Hall  -- Raw Daddy (JimmiJam) -- raw food cones -- http://www.rawdaddyfoods.com/
  • Branden Herrell  --   burgers w/special sauce
  • Angela Montemayor  -- Angela's Blackbottom cakes -- cupcakes
  • Molly de vries  -- The Fabric Society -- textile carriers -- http://ambataliafabrics.blogspot.com/
  • Devon Fenimore  -- Bakesale Fruit Crisps -- fruit crisps -- http://devonfenimore.com/test2/

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Mushroom Season Has Arrived!

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It's here, officially.  The rains came, then we waited, we went to mendocino, found nothing, then waited some more. But now it's here. Behind every stray bramble, beneath every knotted pine, you’ll find them (or hope to).  We’ve waited through the months of cracked ground, dust storms (well, maybe not dust storms), and wilted greens, but now they’re here.

I, and a few like me, found our first mushrooms of the season today.  Porcini, oyster, many yet to be identified. As an aside, I also found some bullwhip kelp, which I am going to try once again to make into a pickle. The last attempt tasted about how you might imagine raw thick rubbery seaweed might taste when prepared incorrectly…raw, thick, and rubbery.It’s a very exciting time, discovering fresh fungus, after so many months of abstinence.  Like that first cigarette after you’ve quit for a month.  Almost worth the wait, just to experience it fresh.

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collecting ideas

I forage for a living. Collect. Glean. Hunt.  Rather than growing, I look out into the world to see what nature has to offer.  Instead of deciding what a plot of land will provide, I let the plants decide.  Choosing where and when they flower.  Wild mushrooms, acorns, blackberries, seaweed. All these and more are my stock and trade, the stuff of my life.  The changing seasons, from spring, with its abundance of greens, to summer, with seaweeds and Seabeans, to fall, with acorns and huckleberries, and finally winter, with the rains come an endless abundance of wild mushrooms.  Chanterelle, matsutake, hedgehog, wild radish, black oak, Salicornia pacifica, mychorizzal, minus tides .  Foraging has changed the way I look at the world. Let me explain. A year ago I started a business/community, forageSF. I started it with the idea to bring wild local edibles to an urban population.  Creating fulfilling jobs for my neighbors, while exposing a whole new populace to the amazing wealth of wild foods growing just outside their doors.  Foraging changes the way you see the world.  With a little knowledge, a non-descript blanket of green is transformed.  It bursts forth, and becomes miners lettuce, chickweed, and wild radish flowers, all delicious salad additions.  From the trail-side "toadstools" burst chanterelles, matsutake, and morel mushrooms, some of the most sought after foods on the planet.  The winter rains cease to be a thing to lament, but instead something to yearn for,with dreams of your secret mushroom spots in full bloom.

Food  has become very important lately. From Slow Food to Weston Price, people are beginning to view food as more than simple sustenance.  People call it a movement.  The food movement.  A movement based around consumption . Not consumption in the sense that we've come to know the word, as the end result of our collective inhalation of the worlds resources. This is a consumption based on a keen awareness of what we’re eating, where it comes from, what it means, how it connects us to the past, and how it nourishes us both physically and culturally.  The life of the pig from birth to death is something that we have come to care about.  Wild boar is sought after, because we feel that animal had a full and healthy life.  This is revolutionary.  We've spent the last 50 years giving little thought to what went into our bodies. Ignoring thousands of years of accumulated human knowledge, we chose microwaves, frozen dinners, and twinkies.  Freeze dried, pre-packed “nutrition”, has replaced common sense. Our ancestors didn’t need to read a nutrition label to know something was good for them.  That knowledge was passed down through millennia of trial and error.  Generations of humans who had eaten and thrived off foods that nourish. The culture of our species is tied to its food, and for too long we have ignored that culture in favor of convenience.  In one generation we have forgotten the lessons of hundreds of past generations. Those who hunted, fished, canned, grew, foraged, and thrived.  Foraging is not a new phenomenon.  It is the oldest example of food. When we forage, we connect ourselves with a lineage that dates back to our first ancestors, and a cultural tradition that is in serious danger of being forgotten.

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August CSF

boxpic This months box:

Dried Porcini and Morel Mushrooms (Mendocino/Humboldt Valley)

Dried Mushrooms, left to refresh in water for about 20 minutes, can be cooked just like fresh. It takes about 10 lbs of fresh wild mushrooms to make 1 lb dried.  Drying actually concentrates the flavor of many mushrooms, such as the bolete.  The Boletus edulis mushroom (bolete) was first described in 1783 by the French botanist Pierre Bulliard and still bears its original name. The Porcini, or King Bolete, is always an exciting find in California since they’re rare and delicious. Porcini are great sautéed with a little (or a lot) of butter.

Orange and Foraged Lemon Juice

Foraged in our own backyard, these lemons were rescued from certain rotting.  We got some fresh squeezed OJ and added foraged lemon juice to give it a good sour bite.

Sea beans (Bolinas)

Pickle weed is a small succulent, with leaves that are waxy on the outside and full of moisture on the inside. Its leaves are long, thin, and round, like little fingers. Pickleweed flowers between April and September, but its tiny yellow flowers can only be seen upon careful examination. Pickle weed grows in the low- to middle-tide zone in the marsh, which means that it gets covered up by water some of the time.  It’s delicious fresh as a garnish, or if you want to get creative in the early morning hours, check out the recipe below.

Wild Foraged Bay Leaves

The very same bay laurel leaves that you see (and smell) all over California, can be used in cooking. The aroma is a bit stronger than store bought, so use sparingly in your favorite soups.

Wild Foraged Blackberries

That’s right, collected just yesterday…they’re delicious.  We had to exercise some serious self control not to eat them all as we picked.  These blackberries come from Mendocino county.

Seabeans Sauteed with onions

This week we wanted to give you an idea of a good way to cook those seabeans you get so often in your box. Here they are, sautéed with some onions, garlic, pepper, and just a pinch of sugar to cut the saltiness. Hope you like them.

Wild Foraged Mint

Use this just like regular mint, the taste is a bit more intense with the wild variety.

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not about food, but about people without any.

So this has nothing to do with food, although it does have to do with community, which I believe (hope) this whole food-ism is really about. I was listening to discussions of the propositions coming up on the May 19th special election. WTF!  Seems like the only way state government can think to bail itself out is pull the rug out from under kids (prop 1D takes 1.7B from early childhood education)and sick people (1E takes $460M from mental health services). It's not only heartless, but myopic and short sighted. Kicking a mentally ill person out of a program that costs $10,000/yr, just to throw them on the street, where they will eventually get arrested, and end up costing the state $100,000/yr, on top of the fact that their life is immeasurably worse, doesn't make sense. I'm sick of hearing that the state government doesn't have any money, and that the only option is to take away even more services from the most vulnerable populations.  I dont see why don't we don't increase taxes on the rich... 50-60-70%. Why not?  If the state government of CA, one of the most wealthy states in the most wealthy country in the world, is actually staring down the abyss into true financial meltdown, if basic services are actually going to stop functioning in six weeks, if the sewers will overflow and there will be anarchy in the streets of a city without cops,  why don't we take some money from the millionaires? Maybe instead of getting the deluxe home theatre they'll only get a 74 inch plasma screen TV, maybe nix the imported italian leather seats in their new lexus.  I realize this is a simplistic argument, but really, why do the people that are least able to afford it always end up paying? why don't you ever see rich people giving bums money?  Why are we all so damned selfish?  crazy world.