wild kitchen

thoughts, wild kitchen

Looking back over four years of dinners

Tonight is our four year anniversary of our Wild Kitchen dinners, our meals that focus on locally foraged ingredients. It's crazy that’s its been four years! I did the first Wild Kitchen on Valentine's Day in a friend of a friend's warehouse in the Mission. At the time my email list was about 50 people - all friends that I knew from the city - and I sent out the little blast with the menu to them. Two days before the event, almost no tickets had sold. I had bought all the food (spent my rent money and then some), had the location, but no one to eat! I was freaking out when my girlfriend at the time suggested I send it to Mission Mission to see if they’d post it. It worked! Allan from Mission Mission posted it and the dinner sold out! It's interesting to think of what would have happened had it gone another way. What would I be doing at this moment? It's crazy how many pivotal moments there are that I can look back on. Moments where it seemed like everything was going to fall apart, but then somehow, miraculously, it all worked out. Someone appears with just the right solution at the right time, or a location pops up out of nowhere when the one you think you’ll use has fallen through, or just the right amount of money falls into your lap to just barely finish buying the food for a dinner. It really is amazing.

We had two kinds of tickets that night, communal and couple. The warehouse where we held the meal had all these great nooks for couples. The one I remember best was an old speedboat, a two seater, where we sat super friendly couple. I distinctly remember them being really into the event and into each other. We turned down the lights and filled the space with candles. The whole night I was worried that the health department was going to show, and there was even this one guy at the table that I became convinced was going to bust me (in retrospect, I think he was just a bit shy and overwhelmed by the whole scene). At that meal I decided it’d be fun if I got up and talked about the dishes as they were coming out, why I chose the ingredients, and what I found exciting about them. This has become an integral part of the dinners, and its fun to try to relate my excitement to the diners.

It’s been a good four years. It’s easy to lose sight in the day to day, but I think that that is what’s good about anniversaries: more than a celebration of the day, they are a chance to look back and see how far you’ve come.

wild kitchen

Wild Kitchen Returns for Spring

Spring is here! We planned to hold off another month before our next Wild Kitchen, but morel season is in full swing and I couldn't bear to see them pass before my eyes without cooking some up.  Asparagus is looking great at the market, so that makes an appearance in a morel risotto with duck confit.

On top of that I'm bringing out some wild boar for a special course of rillete and tart pickled spring veggies. Come join us for a family style meal at communal tables, with each course focused on local wild foraged ingredients. Hope to see you there.

Tickets: Friday April 27, 6-10pm Saturday April 28th, 6pm-10pm Location: 710 Florida St, San Francisco

 

wild kitchen

A Basque Feast: Recap and photos

The Basque feasts were a great success. We sold out both nights, with around 160 people each night, seated at long communal tables. This was my first foray into serving a family style meal, and I think it went really well. Something I've always liked about The Wild Kitchen is how much people interact with eachother. A lot of the dishes we serve have ingredients they've never had before, so there is almost always a pleasant din of "Is that the miners lettuce?"...."I've never had local uni before"....."I had no idea you could make ice cream with acorn flour".  New friends are always made. We also had the special treat of having hand painted menus by Juniper Harrower. She paints with local wine and ink made from ink cap mushrooms she forages. Pretty amazing stuff. The same thing happened with these past meals. Trays of asparagus with guanciale were passed in exchange for salt code rice with piperade, and a similar din ensued. Thanks to everyone that came out, we'll definitely be doing it again.

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photos by Andria Lo

thoughts, wild kitchen

Changing things

Friday was a bad day. An incredibly stressful situation that was solved by writing a check for $1325 to the fire department. Apparently the owner of the building where we're holding our event never finished the permitting process for their occupancy permit. Basically a permit with SFFD that says how many people can safely be in the space. For my $1325 I had the pleasure of having two fire marshalls come and watch us set up, then sit in their cars outside the venue for 4 hours. I struggle to understand how that made anyone safer. The one point the fire department did allow was a pass on our "candle permit". This is something new to me. Everyone who has candles in a restaurant apparently needs to get a candle permit. A payment for every new kind of candle they use....I won't go into it because its boring me even as Im writing it, but suffice to say that it is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard of. Yes, we need to insure public safety, but the idea that we as a people need to be babied to the point where the fire department tells us which kinds of candles to use is beyond comprehension.

Every one of the permits, fees, and taxes that small businesses are charged is justified by some logic. The reality is that when you add them up its an incredible burden. Tens of thousands of dollars go toward these fees, and that's even before you start buying the things that actually make your business run. Everyone I know struggles with this. Constantly being surprised by new fees and permits, many of which appear seemingly out of thin air when the need for city revenue increases.

I ramble, but the thesis of this post is that there needs to be some kind of change. If we are to create a robust local economy, we need to stop taxing small business into the ground. As much as it pains me (I hate politics), I am going to start working with folks in The City to try to streamline some of these processes, and get rid of some of these fees.  There are easy ways to insure the same level of public safety, without all the bureaucracy attached, and hopefully we're at a point now where enough people are behind us to make it happen. Wish me luck.

Iso

wild kitchen

Health Department Blues

01_Wild_Kitchen_Pop_Up_Restaurant_AndriaLo

Our ever evolving saga with the health department has a new chapter. Since June, when The Underground Market was shut down, we have been trying our best to work with DPH (Department of Public Health). We have all the permits we need, fill out the ever increasing number of forms that are required for the privilege of feeding people in our fair city, and jump through all the myriad hoops put in front of us.  I have been trying my best to come up with solutions to re-open The Underground Market that they're ok with, and at every turn we're rebuked. They seem to have no interest in supporting the food community in SF. Every step they take is a step to push anyone doing innovative food further underground. The most recent situation for us is with our upcoming Basque dinners this weekend. After filling out permits, sending in forms, getting a legit kitchen with a permitted dining room, we are still in danger of getting shut down. The space we are using apparently has an invalid occupancy permit the the fire department. This basically means that a form needs to be turned in to prove that people can safely be in the space. This is the same space we have held our events for months, without a peep about occupancy. Suddenly, a day before our event, we're told we're in violation. I can't see this as anything but a move to shut us down.

I realize they have a job to do, but while the city talks out of one side of its mouth about supporting small businesses, and getting people back to work, the very city organizations that deal with small businesses do everything they can to shut us down. If we desire any real change in the way our country eats, we need to do more than just swear off mcdonalds. We need to work together to create a situation where it's easier to serve good local food at a local scale than it is to serve processed crap flown in from all over the world.  We need to do more than just make an effort to shop at farmers markets, we need to work to make it viable for small producers to start businesses using local ingredients.  Thankfully we're moving in that direction, but certainly not there yet.

We are going ahead with our events tomorrow. Wish us luck.

wild kitchen

Health department blues

Our ever evolving saga with the health department has a new chapter. Since June, when The Underground Market was shut down, we have been trying our best to work with DPH (Department of Public Health). We have all the permits we need, fill out the ever increasing number of forms that are required for the privilege of feeding people in our fair city, and jump through all the myriad hoops put in front of us.  I have been trying my best to come up with solutions to re-open The Underground Market that they're ok with, and at every turn we're rebuked. They seem to have no interest in supporting the food community in SF. Every step they take is a step to push anyone doing innovative food further underground. The most recent situation for us is with our upcoming Basque dinners this weekend. After filling out permits, sending in forms, getting a legit kitchen with a permitted dining room, we are still in danger of getting shut down. The space we are using apparently has an invalid occupancy permit the the fire department. This basically means that a form needs to be turned in to prove that people can safely be in the space. This is the same space we have held our events for months, without a peep about occupancy. Suddenly, a day before our event, we're told we're in violation. I can't see this as anything but a move to shut us down. Its ridiculous that DPH can be so shortsighted on these issues.

I realize they have a job to do, but while the city talks out of one side of its mouth about supporting small businesses, and getting people back to work, the very city organizations that deal with small businesses do everything they can to shut us down. If we desire any real change in the way our country eats, we need to do more than just swear off mcdonalds. We need to work together to create a situation where it's easier to serve good local food at a local scale than it is to serve processed crap flown in from all over the world.  We need to do more than just make an effort to shop at farmers markets, we need to work to make it viable for small producers to start businesses using local ingredients.  Thankfully we're moving in that direction, but certainly not there yet.

We are going ahead with our events tomorrow. Wish us luck.

wild kitchen

Wild Kitchen A La Carte - With Pictures

Last week we did our first Wild Kitchen A La Carte. We've been doing prix fixe dinners for about three years now, and I wanted a chance to try something new, as well as give an opportunity for folks to come who hadn't come to our other dinners. It was a great. We only took reservations for parties of 6 or more, and even with that we had about double what we could handle.We fed 160 people each night, and everyone seemed to have a great time.  We had hot towels for people who just sat down, and free mulled wine for those who were waiting. I love hot towels, it makes me feel like I'm really being welcomed and taken care of. There were a few hiccups as with any restaurant opening, but it got me really excited to expand the dinners into other projects Ive been mulling over. We had a few problems. It rained on the first night for the first time in about 4 months, which seemed like a curse, but in the end I think worked out for the best. We probably got fewer walk-ins that night, so got a chance to get our heads around the new model. The other was the health department, who seems to have re-caste me as public enemy number one on the food scene. Even though this was the most legit dinner we've ever done: All the food was prepped and cooked in a restaurant, and then was served in the same restaurant, which was permitted to serve food, they had a problem. Because I didn't turn in a certain form (I won't bore you with the details, but really just a formality), they called the owner of the space and threatened to show up at my dinner with the police and shut us down. Amazing over-reaction. In the end the form was turned in, and the dinners happened, but the whole experience makes me wish more and more that DPH's would work with us to help support the creative food community in SF, rather than seeing it as a problem.

But on a brighter note, we may be taking over the space where we had the dinners, renting it out as a shared-use kitchen, and opening as a pop-up space for other chefs to come in and have their way with the public. More on that soon, but for now..PICTURES! Enjoy, and hope to see you at our next dinner.

Iso

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photos by Andria Lo

wild kitchen

a la carte

Just a quick post today, then I've got to get to the kitchen to do some more recipe testing. Our next Wild Kitchen is going to be an a la carte affair. Eight dishes, order what you want. No reservations for parties under 6. Possible accordian player outside to entertain the line.  We may also do takeout, but that's undecided at this point.  It's going to be something new for us. I'm excited. I'm trying to get this menu as dialed in as possible, so it will be smooth the day of. You can't plan for everything in food. Something is always going to happen that you couldn't have possibly seen coming. Someone won't show up, someone will get hurt, a food order won't come in because a truck broke down because it hit a pothole that was supposed to be fixed the day before but the construction worker just found out his wife had been cheating on him so he didn't come into work. But that's what makes it exciting, and what makes you feel at the end of the night that you've really been through something with the people you work with.  Every night is an rapids course that you work hard to manage, and when you come out the other side in one piece, there is a tired bliss.

wild kitchen

A Wild Kitchen Fishing Trip

This past weekend we did something a bit different for The Wild Kitchen. We usually collect all the food, cook it up, and tell diners about how we did it. This time we got some eaters in on the adventure, with a fishing trip in Half Moon Bay. With guest chef Hank Shaw, we took 21 folks down to half moon bay for a day of fishing on a boat called the Huli Cat. Was a good day. Ocean fishing is something I don't actually have that much experience with, but with Hank on board (a seasoned fisherman), we got along fine. We caught over 200 fish, most of which we cooked up for the next days Wild Kitchen. It was mostly a rock cod day (we made a rock cod bisque as well as as oil poached cod with corn and heirlooms), but we did hit a school of mackeral (which we filleted and pickled for some Saba), and a lucky few caught ling cod (I was one of the lucky ones, with a 12 lb ling cod). Overall it was a good and exhausting day, followed by several hours cleaning the fish we caught (not the best plan after waking up at 4:30am and fishing all day).  The dinners went great, and it was fun to have a guest chef in the mix to change things up a bit. Check out the pics below, and hope to see you all at the next Wild Kitchen.

Thanks

Iso[gallery]

photos by Andria Lo and Ramin Rahimian

wild kitchen

3000 gnocchi, 440 people, 3 dinners, 2nd year anniversary, one boar

Valentine's weekend is over. It was a pretty epic trek for us at the Wild Kitchen.  We fed 440 people (including volunteers of course) in two different locations. It was great, stressful and great.  I wanted to do something special for our two-year anniversary (the first Wild Kitchen was on Valentine's day), so I lowered the menu price, added wine pairings and had two seatings. Two of those were new.  Up until this point we'd always done one seating, and BYOB.  I was most worried about the two seatings, but the drinks ended up being the hardest part.   The worry about the second seating was a timing issue.

What if we didn't get all the food out fast enough? We left enough time so that people wouldn't feel rushed, but since we were working out of unfamiliar kitchens and feed 160 people over 6 hours (for the second and third dinner we actually had to build a kitchen out of fold out tables and portable burners).  That didn't end up being an issue though. Jordan and the volunteers killed it, leaving me and Rachel to worry about why no one out front had drinks. It seems like a small thing, serving drinks, but when you have a room without table numbers, new bartenders and an event website that gives you an unclear numbers, it's a hassle. It worked out in the end though, and hopefully no one noticed the hiccups. Enough with the nuts and bolts, onto the food!

I was really excited about this menu. The dishes were my favorite kind. Simple with intense flavors that all complimented each other. A meal with an arc.

First: Marin Miyagi Oysters with Wild Foraged Herring Roe

This dish has a special place in my heart, due to the fact that I caught the herring myself (look here for a post on that).  It was a nice dish, we added a champagne mignonette, and the roe with the oysters were a great combo.

Second: Soup de poisson with wild nori aioli topped crostini

This is basically a fancy name for fish soup, but calling it fish soup doesn't do it justice. We slow cooked halibut, cod and lobster bones, added mirin, spice and more. It ended up being a really nice full-bodied soup with a great round flavor. The spicy nori aioli added a nice second level to the flavor. Simple. Delicious.

Third: Salad of Frisee, Lardons, Miners lettuce, and a Slow Poached Egg

This was a popular dish, not least because people could not figure out how we perfectly poached 100 eggs in 10 minutes. The trick is the slow poach. Its basically a sous vide egg, that is, something cooked slowly at an exact temp. The egg is cooked in its shell and when you open it, voila! It's poached.  It's hard to do without a circulator, because you have to keep the temperature exact over 40 minutes, but it's amazing to crack open an egg and out it pops perfectly poached.

Fourth: Hand Rolled Gnocchi with Wild Boar Ragu

Boar is always a favorite and add handmade fresh herb crusted gnocchi to it, and it's a winner. This dish took a brigade of us/volunteers several days to make all the gnocchi, but it was worth it. The boar was caught down near Paso Robles by one Mr. Fred, who came and ate the meal on Valentine's day. Full circle.

Last: Gleaned Myer Lemon and Rose Geranium Macarons with Blood Orange Sorbet and Dusted Fennel Pollen

These macarons were made by CD macarons, one of my vendors at the market. I'm not big on sweets, but these were really great, add intense blood orange sorbet and the delicate scent of fennel....

Overall people seemed really happy, with a great meal of handmade food and locally caught boar. That's all we can hope for.  Here are some more pics below. If you're interested in coming to a future dinner, sign up here for our email list.

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photos by Andria Lo

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Valentines dinners and 3000 gnocchi

Just woke up for the second day of our 3 day Valentine’s day dinner marathon. Total this weekend we are going to feed 440 people! By far the most I’ve ever fed.  Friday night went really well.  Had a bit of a hiccup in the beginning (forgot the wine glasses, so had to drive down to Daly city with ten minutes until the dinner started, pay $50 for someone to open the rental warehouse, then somehow fit 6 crates of glasses into a Corolla that already had 600 oysters…), but it worked! The rest of the night went very smooth. This was the first time we had ever done 2 seatings, so there was a bit more pressure to get the food out fast, while still not making it a rushed meal. The favorite of the night was the wild boar ragu, people were basically licking the bowls.

Off to prep now, mostly a big day of opening oysters and rolling gnocchi (more than 3000 over the whole weekend). Maybe I’ll see you tonight.

Iso

wild kitchen

The Wild WIthin...or my national TV debut

I am going to be on "The Wild Within" this Saturday on the travel channel. If you havn't seen it, its a show where one Mr. Steven Rinella goes about the world hunting and gathering his own food. In our episode he tries (somewhat successfully) to gather a meal from San Francisco.   It culminates with an epic feast.  I won't be able to watch it for a couple reasons. 1. Don't have the travel channel, and 2. it's the same day as the market.  I know you'll all be at the market, but if someone records it in a format that is not VHS (how do people record TV these days, I don't really know), I would love a copy. So check it out, should be good.

Iso

wild kitchen

Foraging Mussels

I love collecting mussels. These pics are from a couple weeks ago when me and my girlfriend went down south. Was a lot of fun, mix of work and play.  We actually got approached by a fish and game officer, so I was happy that I bought us both fishing licenses. Its worth it if you are going to collect mussels, because the fines are pretty intense. The limit for mussels is 10 lbs a person. Go at low or minus tide. Have fun! Things to bring:

Gloves

Bucket

Fishing license

Old screwdriver (for prying them off the rocks), don't use your pocketknife, I broke mine collecting mussels.

I just heard an interesting story, that mussel fisherman down south used to save the threads from the mussel "beards" and make gloves out of them. Pretty cool, and makes sense, they are some strong threads.

Recipes, wild kitchen

Fish Soup and Climbing Cezanne's Mountain

My girlfriend Valerie and I just got back from a month long trip to Europe – a land of delicious cheese and keyboards that make typing an inconceivable chore (I mean really, who would design a keyboard where you have to hit alt, command, shift, and 4 to get an @ symbol?).  But, despite their lack of tech design genius (or perhaps in spite of it), I had a great time.

  • Climbed Sainte-Victoire, the 3,000 ft. mountain that inspired Cezanne for three hours hours one foggy night. White glistening rocks, 500 ft. drop-offs, and heavy packs illuminated by head lamps.  At one point we tied ourselves together with a scarf just in case one of us was to fall.  It was worth it to camp in a church at the top of the mountain;  to drink, play music, and cook raclette in the fireplace.
  • Rented the most French apartment I’ve ever seen, complete with a tiny kitchen and the full works of Edith Piaf.
  • Ran from tear gas in Lyon as French students fought with the riot police.  It exposed us to the French peoples’ distaste for work (the retirement age was recently pushed from 60 to 62, spurring riots that shut down highways, gas stations, airports, and trains).
  • Slept in the 2 ft.wide-wide hallway of an overnight train to Alba, Italy, waking up alternately by gesticulating Genovese and grandmothers that seemed to have packed for the apocalypse.
  • Bought our first true European truffle, and tried it on everything from mac and cheese to pizza to omelettes to pasta with béchamel (which I liked so much that I made it at the last Underground Market).
  • Stood under the Eiffel Tower as it began to flash, and realized how much it seems like a spaceship from that angle.
  • Harvested olives in Tuscany until I caught the flu, and walked leisurely like old people through the streets of Tarquenia, stopping at each shop to admire the full legs of procuitto.  It was amazing to see them hand slice that stuff, pure artists).

The one thing I didn’t do was update my blog, but I did write (on real paper no less) and will try to post some of it here very soon. For now, I’m happy to be back and getting into the swing of things again.

The first order of duty was to organize two Wild Kitchen dinners, each featuring nine of my favorites dishes from Europe, with a forageSF twist.  One of my favorite courses of the night was soup de poisson avec aioli maison de nori sauvage.  This dish was inspired by a meal we had in Cassis (a small town in the south of France, from which the crème de’ gets its name).  It was exactly what I’d been looking for since I got to Europe:  a good meal, perfectly cooked, served simply.

Soupe de poisson is essentially a very flavorful fish stock, served with crostini, spicy aioli, and cheese.  The secret is to get an intense rich flavor of seafood and spice.  Rather than being “fishy,” it was more of round and full profile.  I first imagined was just a reduction of fish stock, with the flavor concentrated by long cooking, but as we worked we discovered it needed more to get it just right.

First we experimented with a simple fish stock, which is nothing more than halibut bones, garlic, carrot, onion, celery, and bay leaf.  After cooking for an hour we reduced the liquid by more than half.  This gave us a good flavor, but it wasn’t what I was looking for.  It tasted like fish, but didn’t have that same richness.  We finally found it by adding reduced chicken stock, brandy, oyster liquor and crab “goodies.” If you don’t have those, the stock will still be good, but the fullness they add to the flavor is worth the extra work.

To top it off I made an aioli of wild nori and Sriracha.  Nori is a seaweed I collect locally; its similar to the seaweed used to wrap sushi and our local variety grows abundantly up and down the coast.  We put the aioli on crostini, added a side of mozzarella cheese, and that was it.  A really simple course that was the most popular dish of the night.

Wild Nori Aioli

If you’ve ever made aioli before, it’s the same process, but with addition of chopped nori and Sriracha towards the end. The nori really gives a great layer to the flavor and eating seaweed always makes me feel good. I used nori that I collected during the mid summer when it’s at its peak, and preserved it by cleaning and drying it out. You should try your hand at it too, nori is a great thing to have around to put in soups, and in this case, aioli.

-2 egg yolks

-1 qt. blend oil (a blend of olive and canola) or canola oil

(Pure olive oil has too strong of a taste for aioli.)

-Sriracha hot sauce

-2 cups dried nori (preferably foraged yourself, because its so fun, but don’t feel bad about buying pre-made sheets)

-1/2 clove garlic

-2 tsp. Dijon mustard

-4 tbsp. lemon juice

-Salt/pepper to taste

  1. Pulse eggs, minced garlic, and lemon juice in food processor.
  2. Add the oil, a drop at a time until you have an emulsion, and then add the rest of your oil in a slow but steady stream. You know you’re done when your aioli ceases to be liquid eggs, and thickens to become lovely silky mayo.
  3. Add  nori, and Sriracha, and pulse to incorporate.  Aioli is really a matter of personal taste, so if you feel it’s too thick, add a drop or two of water, not sharp enough, add some more lemon, and of course salt and pepper to taste…feel free to experiment.

Simple Fish Soup

This is essentially a really rich fish stock, and goes amazingly well with the spicy aioli. And it's a fun dish to serve and eat: first, you bring out three bowls containing the crostini, aioli, and cheese as well as the pot of the fish stock. Spread aioli on top of three crostini and sprinkle some cheese on top. Lay these pieces in a bowl and ladle fish stock over it until it slightly covers the bread, then eat by spooning the soaked bread in your mouth. Bon appétit!

-5 lb. halibut bones (or other non-oily white fish such as haddock, hake, or sole). Have your fish guy cut them into pieces about the size of your hand.

-1 lb. carrot

-1 lb. celery

-2 lb. onion

-1/2 lb. fennel

-1/2 cup soy sauce

-1 1/2 cups white wine

-1/2 cup brandy

-2 gal chicken stock

-1 bay leaf

-Salt and pepper to taste

- 3 tbsp crab "goodies" (brains and organs from inside a cooked crab)

-1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

  1. Add fish bones to a oiled stockpot over medium high, cook about 15 minutes until caramelized.
  2. Add rough chopped veggies, brandy, wine, chicken stock, bay leaf, and soy and bring to a boil.
  3. Turn down to a simmer as soon as it boils and cook on low heat for 4 hours.
  4. You’ll know its done when you taste the rich flavors of the stocks coming together. Strain everything through a cheesecloth lined strainer.
  5. Return the soup to the pot and cook it over medium-high heat until it has reduced by half, about an hour.
  6. Serve with sides of crostini, aioli, and mozzarella cheese. You can’t miss with these flavors.

So the trip was great! We ate good food, met good people, and had some adventures, but it's nice to be back.

Iso

Recipes by Iso Rabins and Jordan Grosser

photos by Valerie Luu

wild kitchen

Pics from our last dinner

Hey all This last week we did three wild kitchen dinners in a row. Was fun, and really exhausting.  I love cooking, and being able to do it on that scale was a good time.  We're going to be doing at least 3 more this month, look out for the menu in about a week. We're also going to be offering ten $40 tickets per meal  (in addition to the the 55 $80 tickets).    I like the idea of the dinners being more accessible, but I couldn't pay the rent, and get the quality of food I serve, if they were all that price.  If you can afford the $80 ticket, please leave the lower priced seats for those who can't.  I will be announcing the sale of these lower cost tickets on twitter a few days before the general tickets go on sale, so if you're not already, follow us (that phrase has always stuck me as strange, but what else is there...twitter us....join us....). Anyway, onto the pics! These were taken by one ms. Andria Lo, I really like her style.  If you want to check out the next dinner, please sign up for our email list in the "subscribe" box at foragesf.com

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wild kitchen

June Wild Kitchen pics

Here are some pics from our last Wild Kitchen dinner. If you’re interested in coming to the next one, sign up in the “subscribe” box at foragesf.com, and we’ll send you an email when its coming up. Thanks to everyone who came to the dinners this past Thursday and Friday. It was our first attempt at doing two in a row, and it turned out to be a lot of fun.

photos by Robin Jolin: robinjolin.com

Thanks!